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CHILDREN'S NURSERY RHYMES

 
	 

Children in English-speaking countries learn many rhyming songs during their early years. 

Here are some of the more well-known. Many are several hundred years old. 

If you're a teacher at school these rhymes work well in classes of younger children. 

They can be sung or spoken. Click here to read some ideas on how to use 

rhymes with children.

 
 Rhymes: BANBURY CROSS;  BLACK SHEEP;   BOBBY SHAFTOE;  COCK-A-DOODLE-DO;  COFFEE AND TEA;  
CROOKED SIXPENCE;  CRY BABY BUNTING;  EENSY WEENSY SPIDER;  GEORGIE PORGY;  GOOSEY GOOSEY GANDER; 
HICKORY, DICKORY, DOCK;  HUMPTY DUMPTY;  JACK;  JACK AND JILL;   LITTLE MISS MUFFET;  LITTLE STAR;  
MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB; OLD KING COLE;  OLD MOTHER HUBBARD;  ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR;  POLLY AND SUKEY;  
ROBIN REDBREAST;   SIMPLE SIMON;  SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE;  SLUGS AND SNAILS;  TEDDY BEAR;  
THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE;  THIRTY DAYS;  THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE;  THERE WAS AN OLD LADY;   
THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN.
 
THERE WAS AN OLD LADY
There was an old lady who swallowed a fly.
I don't know why she swallowed a fly.
I guess she'll die.
There was an old lady who swallowed a spider
That wiggled and jiggled and tickled insider her.
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.
I don't know why she swallowed a fly.
I guess she'll die.
There was an old lady who swallowed a bird.
How absurd! To swallow a bird!
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider
That wiggled and jiggled and tickled insider her.
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.
I don't know why she swallowed a fly.
I guess she'll die.
(Continue verses)
Cat . . . Imagine that! She swallowed a cat.
Dog . . . What a hog! She swallowed a dog.
Goat . . . She opened her throat and in walked a goat.
Cow . . . I don't know how she swallowed that cow.
There was an old lady, she swallowed a horse.
She died of course! 

 

GOOSEY, GOOSEY, GANDER

Goosey, goosey, gander,
Whither dost thou wander?
Upstairs and downstairs
And in my lady's chamber.

There I met an old man
Who wouldn't say his prayers;
I took him by the left leg,
And threw him down the stairs.

 

 EENSY WEENSY SPIDER (Itsy Bitzy Spider)

The eensy weensy spider
Crawled up the water spout
Down came the rain
And washed the spider out
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
And the eensy weensy spider
Crawled up the spout again.

 

THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE

Hey, diddle, diddle!
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon
 
POLLY AND SUKEY

Polly, put the kettle on,
Polly, put the kettle on,
Polly, put the kettle on,
And let's drink tea.
Sukey, take it off again,
Sukey, take it off again,
Sukey, take it off again,
They're all gone away.
 
SIMPLE SIMON
Simple Simon met a pieman,
Going to the fair;
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
"Let me taste your ware."
Says the pieman to Simple Simon,
"Show me first your penny,"
Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
"Indeed, I have not any."
Simple Simon went a-fishing
For to catch a whale;
All the water he could find
Was in his mother's pail!
Simple Simon went to look
If plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.
He went to catch a dicky bird,
And thought he could not fail,
Because he had a little salt,
To put upon its tail.
He went for water with a sieve,
But soon it ran all through;
And now poor Simple Simon

Bids you all adieu.
 
 LITTLE STAR
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are
 

TEDDY BEAR, TEDDY BEAR

Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Touch the ground.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Turn around.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Show your shoe.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
That will do.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Run upstairs.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Say your prayers.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Blow out the light.
Teddy bear, Teddy bear,
Say good night.

 

OLD KING COLE

Old King Cole Was a merry old soul,

And a merry old soul was he;

He called for his pipe,

And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers three!

And every fiddler, he had a fine fiddle,

And a very fine fiddle had he.

"Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee, went the fiddlers.

Oh, there's none so rare

As can compare With King Cole and his fiddlers three.

 

JACK AND JILL

Jack and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down, and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.
When up Jack got and off did trot,
As fast as he could caper,
To old Dame Dob, who patched his nob
With vinegar and brown paper.
 

BANBURY CROSS

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
To see an old lady upon a white horse.
Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes,
She shall have music wherever she goes.
 

BLACK SHEEP

Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes, I have,
Three bags full;
One for my master,
One for my dame,
But none for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.
 

CRY BABY BUNTING

Cry, baby bunting,
Father's gone a-hunting,
Mother's gone a-milking,
Sister's gone a-silking,
And brother's gone to buy a skin
To wrap the baby bunting in.
 
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;
All the King's horses, and all the King's men
Couldn't put Humpty Dumpty together again.
 
BOBBY SHAFTOE
Bobby Shaftoe's gone to sea,
With silver buckles on his knee:
He'll come back and marry me,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe!
Bobby Shaftoe's fat and fair,
Combing down his yellow hair;
He's my love for evermore,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
 
THE CAT AND THE FIDDLE
Hey, diddle, diddle!
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.
 
COCK-A-DOODLE-DO
Cock-a-doodle-do!
My dame has lost her shoe,
My master's lost his fiddle-stick
And knows not what to do.
Cock-a-doodle-do!
What is my dame to do?
Till master finds his fiddle-stick,
She'll dance without her shoe.
 
CROOKED SIXPENCE
There was a crooked man, 
and he went a crooked mile, 
He found a crooked sixpence 
beside a crooked stile; 
He bought a crooked cat, 
which caught a crooked mouse, 
And they all lived together 
in a little crooked house.
 
COFFEE AND TEA
Molly, my sister and I fell out,
And what do you think it was all about?
She loved coffee and I loved tea,
And that was the reason we couldn't agree.
 
OLD MOTHER HUBBARD
Old Mother Hubbard;
Went to the cupboard,
To give her poor dog a bone;
But when she got there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.
She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread;
When she came back
The dog was dead.
She went to the undertaker's
To buy him a coffin;
When she got back
The dog was laughing.
She took a clean dish
To get him some tripe;
When she came back
He was smoking a pipe.
She went to the alehouse
To get him some beer;
When she came back
The dog sat in a chair.
She went to the tavern
For white wine and red;
When she came back
The dog stood on his head.
She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat;
When she came back
He was feeding the cat.
She went to the barber's
To buy him a wig;
When she came back
He was dancing a jig.
She went to the fruiterer's
To buy him some fruit;
When she came back
He was playing the flute.
She went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat;
When she came back
He was riding a goat.
She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes;
When she came back
He was reading the news.
She went to the sempster's
To buy him some linen;
When she came back
The dog was a-spinning.
She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose;
When she came back
He was dressed in his clothes.
The dame made a curtsy,
The dog made a bow;
The dame said, "Your servant,"
The dog said, "Bow-wow."
 
ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR
One, two, three, four, five,
Once I caught a fish alive.
Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,
But I let it go again.
Why did you let it go?
Because it bit my finger so.
Which finger did it bite?
The little one upon the right.
 
SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE
Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie!
When the pie was opened
The birds began to sing;
Was not that a dainty dish
To set before the king?
The king was in his counting-house,
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlor,
Eating bread and honey.
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes;
When down came a blackbird
And snapped off her nose.
 
SLUGS AND SNAILS
What are little boys made of, made of? 
What are little boys made of? 
"Slugs and snails, and puppy-dogs' tails; 
And that's what little boys are made of." 
What are little girls made of, made of ? 
What are little girls made of? 
"Sugar and spice, and all that's nice; 
And that's what little girls are made of."
 
ROBIN REDBREAST
Little Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree,
Up went Pussy-Cat, down went he,
Down came Pussy-Cat, away Robin ran,
Says little Robin Redbreast: "Catch me if you can!
Little Robin Redbreast jumped upon a spade,
Pussy-Cat jumped after him, and then he was afraid.
Little Robin chirped and sang, and what did Pussy say?
Pussy-Cat said: "Mew, mew, mew," and Robin flew away.
 
LITTLE MISS MUFFET
Little Miss Muffet
Sat on a tuffet,
Eating her curds and whey;
There came a big spider,
And sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss Muffet away.
 
GEORGIE PORGY
Georgy Porgy, pudding and pie,
Kissed the girls and made them cry.
When the boys came out to play,
Georgy Porgy ran away.
 
HICKORY DICKORY DOCK
Hickory, dickory, dock!
The mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one,
And down he run,
Hickory, dickory, dock!
 
THIRTY DAYS
Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November;
February has twenty-eight alone,
All the rest have thirty-one,
Excepting leap-year, that's the time
When February's days are twenty-nine.
 
JACK
This is the house that Jack built. 
This is the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the cow with the crumpled horn, 
That tossed the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the maiden all forlorn, 
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, 
That tossed the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the man all tattered and torn, 
That kissed the maiden all forlorn, 
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, 
That tossed the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the priest all shaven and shorn, 
That married the man all tattered and torn, 
That kissed the maiden all forlorn, 
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, 
That tossed the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the cock that crowed in the morn, 
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, 
That married the man all tattered and torn, 
That kissed the maiden all forlorn, 
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, 
That tossed the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the farmer sowing the corn, 
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn. 
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, 
That married the man all tattered and torn, 
That kissed the maiden all forlorn, 
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, 
That tossed the dog, 
That worried the cat, 
That killed the rat, 
That ate the malt 
That lay in the house that Jack built.
 
 MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB
Mary had a little lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow.
Everywhere that Mary went,
The lamb was sure to go.
It followed her to school one day,
Which was against the rules.
It made the children laugh and play,
To see a lamb at school.
 
THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN
There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
She had so many children she didn't know what to do.
She gave them some broth without any bread.
She whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.

 

If you can't find the rhyme you're looking for here, try these songs.

 

 

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